Bramblewilde

Four concerned mothers seek the services of Bramblewilde, seeing magic and trickery as the only reasonable way to convince their daughters to marry.

  • Excerpt

    “What is it you want?” Bramblewilde asked.

    “Husbands.” Mrs. Clarke’s eyes gleamed.

    “We fear, without your assistance, the girls will become spinsters.” Mrs. Wollstonecraft shook her head.

    “And we want them,” Mrs. Rothchild said, “as soon as may be arranged. While there is still time for grandchildren.”

    “Very well.” Bramblewilde said. “I will need something of value from each of you, then. And you must make a promise—no—you must solemnly swear to never harm, harangue, or try to coax or bring away by force an occupant of this cottage, no matter what becomes of the magic.”

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